Discover Alberta Ancestors
MACLEOD, Col. James Farquharson (1836-1894)

MACLEOD, Col. James Farquharson (1836-1894)

(1885-1953)
If it were not for James F. Macleod, our fair city would have been known as Bow Fort, or even stranger, Fort Brisebois.  Born on the Isle of Skye, Scotland, he migrated with his family to Canada in 1854 and began a career in law in 1860.  Macleod joined the militia and ended up as a brigade-major in the 1870 Red River Rebellion, giving him a taste of the West.  Three years later, the NWMP was formed and at age 47, he signed up and was promoted to assistant commissioner.
SALTERIO, Joseph (1860-1892)

SALTERIO, Joseph (1860-1892)

(1885-1953)
Calgary has a connection to the Sundance Kid, notorious outlaw and train robber. The Grand Central Hotel on Atlantic Avenue (9th Avenue) was owned by Joseph Salterio. The hotel had survived the great fire of 1886 that had destroyed a large portion of the town. Salterio was a well known and popular proprietor. He had "a host of friends and few or no enemies. He was most liberal and kind hearted[1].In 1892, during Salterio's ownership, Frank Hamilton and Harry Longabaugh (better known as The Sundance Kid) took over the hotel's saloon. But their partnership was short lived.
Sam Livingston

Sam Livingston

(1885-1953)
Samuel (Sam) Henry Harkwood Livingston (4 February 1831 – 4 October 1897) was a gold prospector and great innovator who brought the first examples of mechanized equipment to farming in the Calgary area. Usually wearing his traditional fringed buckskin clothes, broad-rimmed hat and long hair and beard, he looked every bit the old prospector that he was. Prospecting Years Still in his teens, Sam emigrated from Ireland to Wisconsin in 1847. He travelled to the California Gold Rush of 1849, visited New Mexico, and then travelled to Montana in 1859. He also participated in British Columbia’s Cariboo Gold Rush of 1858 by way of Pincher Creek and the Crowsnest Pass. He returned to Alberta through the Kicking Horse Pass in 1864, travelling with a group of prospectors who later disbanded… Still in his teens, Sam emigrated from Ireland to Wisconsin in 1847. He travelled to the California Gold Rush of 1849, visited New Mexico, and then travelled to Montana in 1859. Test
John Ware

John Ware

(1885-1953)
John Ware was an African-American cowboy who was influential in the early years of the burgeoning ranching industry in Southern Alberta. Remembered for his excellent horsemanship, he was among the first ranchers in Alberta, arriving in 1882 on a cattle drive from the Unites States and settling to ranch until his death in 1905. John Ware was born in 1850 into slavery in South Carolina, After the Civil War, John left the Carolinas for Texas where he learned the skills of a rancher and became a cowboy. Upon his arrival in Calgary he found work at the Bar U and Quorn ranches before starting his own ranch, the “4 Nines” near the Red Deer River. By 1900, he and his wife, Mildred Lewis, had six children. Ware moved from the Calgary area to a spot northeast of the village of Duchess, Alberta. In 1902 his first home was destroyed by the spring flood. He rebuilt on higher ground overlooking a stream, now called Ware Creek.