Discover Alberta Ancestors
DIXON, Robert (1861-1955)

DIXON, Robert (1861-1955)

(1885-1953)
A pioneer who dined with Jesse and Frank James and played billiards with Louis Riel, lived to 94.  He came from Scotland to Canada seeking adventure, which found him, as a N.W.M.P. scout and undercover man.  His nickname came from the number of prairie rattlers that he had killed.
DENNY, Cecil Edward (1850-1928)

DENNY, Cecil Edward (1850-1928)

(1885-1953)
Crossed the plains in 1874 as Inspector in the original North West Mounted Police. Co-founder of Forts Macleod and Calgary. Honorary Chieftain in Blackfoot Nation. Indian Agent, government archivist, explorer, pioneer, adventurer and author. "He knew not fear; a born optimist." Sir Denny wrote of his arrival at the site of Calgary: "The view from the hill on the north side of Bow River, when we reached it at the beginning of September, 1875, was a beautiful one. A lonely valley lay before us with rolling hills to the south. There was much wood on both sides of the Bow and Elbow rivers. The mountains with their snowy peaks to the west, also an open valley south of the Elbow, and much timber along the Bow. There were many large bands of buffalo moving and grazing in the valleys, but no sign of human habitation. Our first sight of this lonely spot was one never to be forgotten, and one that only a poet could do justice to. It was by far the most beautiful spot seen in the west."
GLENN, John (1833-1886)

GLENN, John (1833-1886)

(1885-1953)
John Glenn was a Calgary pioneer who has shown abundant proof what may be done by industry and perseverance, backed up by sound judgement. He was a first settler and farmer in the Fish Creek region, and noted for his hospitality. John spent a great deal of money on experimental farming and erected the largest stables in the town of Calgary and two of the largest stores at the time. His motto through life was "Live within your means, and save a beet for a hungry day."
MACLEOD, James Farquharson (1836-1894)

MACLEOD, James Farquharson (1836-1894)

(1885-1953)
If it were not for James F. Macleod, our fair city would have been known as Bow Fort, or even stranger, Fort Brisebois.  Born on the Isle of Skye, Scotland, he migrated with his family to Canada in 1854 and began a career in law in 1860.  Macleod joined the militia and ended up as a brigade-major in the 1870 Red River Rebellion, giving him a taste of the West.  Three years later, the NWMP was formed and at age 47, he signed up and was promoted to assistant commissioner.
SALTERIO, Joseph (1860-1892)

SALTERIO, Joseph (1860-1892)

(1885-1953)
Calgary has a connection to the Sundance Kid, notorious outlaw and train robber. The Grand Central Hotel on Atlantic Avenue (9th Avenue) was owned by Joseph Salterio. The hotel had survived the great fire of 1886 that had destroyed a large portion of the town. Salterio was a well known and popular proprietor. He had "a host of friends and few or no enemies. He was most liberal and kind hearted[1].In 1892, during Salterio's ownership, Frank Hamilton and Harry Longabaugh (better known as The Sundance Kid) took over the hotel's saloon. But their partnership was short lived.